The number of asset-less debtors going bankrupt has reached such levels that the cost of processing these bankruptcies is becoming unsustainable for the Insolvency Service, according to Stephen Speed, chief executive and inspector general of the Insolvency Service, who was speaking at the recent Insolvency Today annual conference.

While this news of asset-less debtors using our easy bankruptcy laws to start afresh is encouraging, Speed also said that a point had almost been reached whereby taxpayer money would be required to cover the shortfall of the processing costs, which, according to reports, seems likely given that the Insolvency Service was forced to write of £81 million earlier this year.

Try the Banks

No, you're not having any of it back

Following the great taxpayer robbery of the banking bailouts – where free-market profit-chasers brought the world to its knees with their financial jiggery-pokery and eye-watering bonuses and then went cap in hand to the state when it all blew up – the idea of more taxpayer money being required to plug a hole, this time to cover the mistakes of individual borrowers, will no doubt result in more opprobrium being directed at debtors by the more pious sectors of society. Yet, and now stop me if this sounds ridiculous, surely it would be better to assess each individual’s case and try to determine whether the lenders had been at all culpable and had irresponsibly lent to people they knew would have little chance of paying the money back?

Making the banks pay for their mistakes and their greed – what a ridiculous notion.

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